Fed by Jesus

One of the most infamous stories of the New Testament is represented in all four of the gospels – when Jesus feeds five thousand. And that number, five thousand, was just accounting for the men. Think of all the women and children who would have joined in as well. Jesus knew how many were there that day. He knew the story within each heart sitting on the green grass with hungry bellies and parched souls.

I love how each gospel provides slightly different details of this story, but they have a common thread of Jesus feeding the people who are present. Recently, what stuck out to me is how Jesus fed the people. I love feeding my family, but sometimes it’s just a chore that needs to be done. It’s tempting to throw something together so they stop hounding me, so we can move on to the next thing, or so we can call it a day and all go to bed. Guilty. Based on Jesus’ response, I don’t believe this meal was a ‘chore’ for him.

Jesus wasn’t about shutting them up so he could move on to the next town. He didn’t miraculously make food appear on their laps so he could quickly withdraw to a peaceful place. Jesus saw the great crowd of people coming and knew the hunger in their souls and bellies. (Luke 6:1-5) When he saw them coming, He had compassion on them. (Matthew 14:14) Jesus saw they were like sheep without a shepherd, He knew they needed to be fed (Mark 6:34), and He welcomed them. (Luke 9:11)

The people were seen. And not only were they seen, but Jesus welcomed them with compassion. He welcomed those seeking Him with curiosity, faith and illness. Those who sought after Jesus were not turned away as he met both their physical and emotional needs. He healed the sick, and I’m sure He probably mended some broken hearts.

All of the people were accepted and brought into the fold, fed and cared for. And not just enough to get by, but abundantly. After each belly had been filled, there were enough fragments gathered to fill twelve baskets! Nothing went to waste, not the food or the journey of the five thousand. I imagine each person on the hill that day felt a personal connection to Jesus as they reached into the basket, and received provision.

When you seek Jesus, you will be compassionately welcomed. He knows the journey you’ve been on. He sees you, and knows you need a shepherd. He knows you need to be fed and rest on a soft patch of green for a while. Jesus knows, because he took on the form of man so that He could compassionately welcome you into His heavenly arms.

Can I encourage you to seek Jesus? And not just today, but each day. Jesus fed those who were present with Him. Seek Him honestly, and with faith. Can you trust Him to provide a soft place to fall, to rest and be fed?

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“Jesus said to them, ‘I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst.” John 6:35 (ESV) // Photo by Mike Kenneally on Unsplash

Scripture for feeding the five thousand :: Matthew 14:13-21; Mark 6:30-44; Luke 9:10-17; John 6:1-15

 

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Come and See

I’ve embarked on a journey through the gospels, reading them together chronologically. I’m just a few days in, and loving it. Scripture is packed with nuggets of truth and wisdom. Makes me think of Psalm 119:130, “The unfolding of your words give light; it imparts understanding to the simple.” Well, I can be pretty simple so this verse is an encouragement to me.

Today I was reading the story of Jesus’ first meeting of his disciple Philip in John 1:43-51. I’d read this passage of scripture before, but today it ‘unfolded’ before me in a new way. Philip, a true disciple at heart, immediately brings a man named Nathanael to meet Jesus. It’s like he can’t help it! And despite Philip’s enthusiasm, Nathanael’s first response was filled with judgment about this man from Nazareth, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” (John 1:46, ESV) Philip’s response? “Come and see.” (John 1:46, ESV)

Jesus greets Nathanael in a very personal way, going so far as to call out where he was at the time Philip came to him. Jesus knew Nathanael’s heart, and spoke directly to him in a personal way. Isn’t that how Jesus speaks to each one of our hearts, if we allow him to? If we would accept the invitation to ‘come and see’.

Sometimes our first response is filled with doubt and judgement, like Nathanael. But once confronted with Jesus, he wasted no time at claiming that Jesus was who he said he was. As one of the first to recognize Messiah, he exclaimed, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” (John 1:49, ESV)

I wonder what Nathanael’s faith walk was like after this encounter. Were there ups and downs? Did he pursue Jesus faithfully every day, without doubt? I believe Nathanael walked closely with his Rabbi, and had a personal relationship with him. In John 21:2 as Jesus appears to the disciples after his resurrection, revealing himself to Nathanael. Wow. Don’t you wonder what that would have been like?!

Even if our first response to Jesus each day is not faith-filled, He still knows our heart and how to speak personally to us. The Lord knows us better than we do; we are His creation after all. To have that personal relationship with the Lord, we must ‘come and see’. Come to Him in worship, scripture and prayer. God will intimately speak to our hearts when we enter into relationship with Him. And with Nathanael’s response, we can exclaim who He is, give Him glory in worship and praise. “You are the Son of God!”

Can I encourage you to read John 1:43-51 today? Ask the Lord to unfold this encounter with Jesus’ in a new way. He is so faithful. You are seen by the living God, Creator of heaven and earth. He desires to have that personal relationship with you, His creation. Lean in close, letting your doubt become faith. Come to Him, and see.

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“Oh, taste and see that the LORD is good! Blessed is the man who takes refuge in him.!” Psalm 34:8 Photo by Alisa Anton on Unsplash

 

Tested Genuiness

I had the joy of sitting down to breakfast with a group of high school students for breakfast recently; it was a Wednesday morning prayer breakfast. This group of young people gather nearly every Wednesday morning before school for a devotional and to share a meal together. It’s truly amazing – teens who willingly get up early in order to spend time in fellowship and God’s word. Biscuits & gravy, eggs, hash browns and chocolate milk may have something to do with it…

After breakfast we visited about trials and testing, how it is a continual process where God uses everything. I was able to use the example of rendering beeswax and that when all the ick is filtered out, we are able to shine God’s love more brightly to others. We looked at 1 Peter 1:3-9 and the idea of our faith being a treasure to the Lord.

“In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith – more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire – may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.”  1 Peter 1:6-7 (ESV, emphasis mine)

Trials come and go but when we’re going through it, it feels like forever. Time can stand still as we focus on “it” – whatever “it” happens to be at the present time. No matter what our circumstances are, scripture promises that “it” will only last a little while in the scope of eternity with the Lord. That testing is part of our faith, tested to be genuine to the Lord. That’s a hard one to swallow when your in the thick of it.

But take a look at that last little bit, the portion about praise, glory, and honor. Those three things have the power to change an atmosphere and an attitude. Giving God praise through the trial, is glorifying to Him. When I focus my attention on the One over the circumstances, there is a peace that passes all understanding. I’m also honoring Him with my thoughts, which is reflected in my actions and reactions.

I’m not going to sugar coat this, it’s hard. But we have the ability to offer up praises to Him as a sacrifice through the trials. I want to challenge you with this. In the hardship, instead of your normal response, try worshiping or praising God. In believing and trusting God, offer up praise, glory, and honor to Him through your trail. I believe a tested and genuine faith will be revealed. I’ve experienced it. How about you? Have you ever thought about your faith being a treasure to God, more precious than gold, refined in the Refiner’s fire?

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“Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of many kinds, for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness. And let steadfastness have its full effect, that yo may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing.” James 1:2-4 (ESV) Photo by Evaldas Daugintis on Unsplash

 

 

What are you listening to? Fear or Faith?

When I was a little girl, my dad would tell us a story about Red Eyes and Bloody Bones. This story would often be told around a campfire or as we navigated the hills and curves of country roads at night. I recall the angst one night as he turned off the car’s headlights at just the right time, so we could see the taillights of another vehicle a half mile up the road. The story can still make me squirm, and I know it’s make-believe!

One night, when my children were old enough, they too were introduced to this scary tale during a slumber party at Grandma and Grandpa’s house. My son knew it was just a pretend story, he remained strong and courageous throughout the tale. My daughter, however, was fearful. Why did their reactions differ? My daughter let her imagination run wild, losing all sight of the fact it was a made-up story.

Some of our fear and anxiety is natural and appropriate, rational. For example, our fears can keep us safe when danger is present. We may experience fear when doing something outside of our comfort zone. While irrational fears, like my daughter’s runaway imagination. It’s a fear held in the future that can grip us so tight that movement forward is nearly impossible.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve often moved forward afraid. I may be putting one foot in front of the other, but there was a whole heap of fear behind it. Forcing myself to go, full of doubt and questioning. The story I was telling myself, and believing, lacked all confidence and faith. Faith in God, others or myself.

Currently, I’m reading Louie Giglio’s book “Goliath Must Fall”. (Just a short way in, but I highly recommend it!) In his book Louie says, “The antidote to fear is faith. And the soundtrack of faith, is worship.” (pg.59) That statement is truth.

A couple weeks ago, our daughter was very sick. At the peak of her illness, I began to let fear grip my heart. And having the two girls alone together, who’s imaginations tend to run wild, was not exactly the best thing. Let me tell you, I’m embarrassed to say I went to a dark place real quick. But in an effort to calm her, I turned on some worship music. It changed the atmosphere. Prayer and worship washed over my heart too. We were both able to wrangle ourselves from the grip of fear, and into a place of faith and trust in God. We were both reminded that we are beloved daughters of The Healer.

We can choose to live in fear from so much in this fallen world. Especially when it’s hard to wrap our brains and hearts around the atrocities of school shootings, the seemingly unfair death of loved ones, and rampant addiction. It’s hard when we feel helpless, or hopeless, but we are not. We can choose to worship, playing the soundtrack of faith. We can choose to trust God’s sovereignty over all, and walk in faith. We can choose to be a light to those around us, sharing the love of God in the simplest form of a smile, acknowledging to others that they are seen.

What soundtrack are you listening to right now? Is it one of fear filled with lies, or is if one of faith and worship?

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“Faith comes by hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ.” Romans 10:17 (ESV) Photo by Hanny Naibaho on Unsplash